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ART: THE 'SALVATOR MUNDI' OF LEONARDO MAY FIND A NEW HOME AT THE DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART

Date:

11/26/2012



ART: THE 'SALVATOR MUNDI' OF LEONARDO MAY FIND A NEW HOME AT THE DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART

Houston, Nov. 4. - (Adnkronos) - The Odyssey of the 'Salvator Mundi', the masterpiece discovered last year and attributed to Leonardo da Vinci, may soon have a happy ending: not in a Gallery of the Louvre Museum in Paris as the 'Gioconda', but at the Dallas Museum of Art in Texas. The rumors of a possible purchase by the first and most prestigious Museums of the Lone Star State led by its new Director Maxell Anderson, have become more insistent since last summer. 'We brought the picture recently attributed to Leonardo at the Dallas Museum of Art, and we are considering the possibility of a purchase', declared Jill Bernestein, in charge of communication for the Museum.
A strong and determined personality, Anderson is internationally renowned for the innovations introduced in the American Museums he previously directed and for his essay on 'Metrics of Success in Art Museums', where he presents a vision of the Museum as a place to gather and a tourist attraction together with a series of parameters to measure its success. In this perspective the purchase - which many consider imminent - of a work of art such as the 'Slavator Mundi' would certainly help in propelling the DMA in the restricted number of the world's most popular Museums.

"The image of Italy in Texas and in the United States would benefit enormously from the acquisition of this work of art, which would also coincide with the Year of Italian Culture in the United States", comments the Consul General of Italy in Houston Fabrizio Nava, remembering that in 2013 Italy will be the unquestioned protagonist of American culture with a rich program of events.
The work of art - oil on wood depicting Christ blessing with the right hand while holding in the left the Globe, a symbol of universal power - was presumably painted by the Master around 1499. Its incredible success was at the origin of many copies which ended up confusing the whereabouts of the original already in the 17the century. The story of the 'Salvator Mundi' continued for centuries, following the plot suggested by different sources that showed the movements of this piece first in Europe then across the Ocean. From a convent in Nantes after the French occupation of Milan to the private collection of Charles the First of England, then auctioned in unknown hands.
Every announcement on the recovery of the lost Leonardo were put to silence by experts until last year. Then the discovery came, certified by some of Da Vinci's greatest scholars, when a group of American collectors gave in 2010 the picture to the National Gallery of London for a restoration in view of the exhibition 'Leonardo Da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan' to be held the following year.
The 'Wall Street Journal', quoting well informed sources, suggested after the finding a quotation of over 200 million dollars. This sum, however, was never confirmed neither by the interested parties, the consortium of American art dealers led by Robert Simon, owner of the art gallery with the same name in New York, and the Director of the Dallas Museum of Art, Maxell Anderson. The negotiation under way, in spite of general curiosity, remains top secret.
(Sub/Ct/Adnkronos) 03-NOV-12 18:26 NNNN


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